The Tin Whistle

counterculture history and conspiracy theory

Posts Tagged ‘conspiracy theory

The Rise of Bot Nation

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botsPeople wonder why social networks are filled with people pushing rabbit holes like: Sandy Hook never happened, Chemtrails are everywhere, or We Never Landed on the Moon. And why does a river of disinfo instantly appear after every single tragic event? Real researchers avoid this gunk.

It’s sort of like the boy who cried wolf: by blanketing every tragic incident with complex disinfo campaigns, the perpetrators are better able to hide their manufactured incidents. And they greatly inflate their powers through hints that everything is a grand plot under their control. Meanwhile, by constantly amplifying tragedy and creating paranoia, they spin the dials of PTSD inside the minds of the entire nation.

Masters of mind control have been around for a long time, and so has hypnosis and robot zombies. Fear has always been the essential key to opening these doors. All apocalyptic religions are mind control, and anyone who believes the world is about to end is running a mind control script, which is like changing the software operating system inside your brain. And we are talking millions, if not billions, of people on apocalyptic mind control.

When the internet came along, it provided global peer-to-peer communication for the first time, without the intervention of the media portals run by the military-industrial complex. This provided a tool for citizens to share information and expose the hoodwinks of war for profit. And in response, there’s been a rush by the National Security State to create a Bot Nation to create a false consensus in social media. These bots could be multiplying faster than real human beings.

One thing about these operations: you can recognize agents of disinfo because they go ballistic if you question their posts, almost as if they are running a script. There’s never a hint of discussion or debate over facts or evidence, because that would just serve to educate others monitoring the thread. Just all-out war and vicious character assassination.

It’s the flip side of what the media does should anyone mention we need a new 9/11 investigation. You just won’t hear that on the national news. And yet, that’s the way a lot of people in Congress feel, they just know you can’t talk about it and survive in politics. Just like many reporters know you can’t talk about alternative 9/11 conspiracies if you want to survive in the corporate media. So the only ones that get to go there and survive are the fake whistleblowers who serve as lightning rods, gathering oppositional energy into the control of the National Security State. Both Snowden and Wikileaks fall into this category. Anytime a whistleblower ends up on Time magazine, rest assured you’re looking at an intelligence operation.

The social media conspiracy community is dominated by bots running false memes, while the mainstream media amplifies tragedies as much as possible by showing as much blood and tears as possible, and jolting Americans into hyper states of empathetic fear.

Wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to worry about our National Security State staging terror incidents in order to keep us under mind control? Because that’s what we’re looking forward to. The internet provided a tool for turning the tables and installing a democracy in the future, but the bots will take over if we let them. So please stop passing around those crazy conspiracy stories they manufacture.

Of course, if you’ve got something credible about the JFK assassination or 9/11, go ahead and share it. Funny how I see so little of that stuff going around. Wonder why.

http://www.amazon.com/Magic-Chakra-Candles/dp/B00BVMZ8U8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415013461&sr=8-1&keywords=candles+Steven+hager

Written by Steven Hager

March 29, 2014 at 3:50 pm

Religious Beliefs Now a Disease, says AMA

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Religious beliefs have been officially recognized as a form of mental illness by the American Medical Association, an action that paves the way for all church-goers to be institutionalized should they continue to lose faith in the American way of life. This unexpected new decision was made Friday by delegates in Boston, who went against a recommendation from the committee that had studied the subject.

??????????????Dr. Humbert Flinkenstein of Yale School of Medicine commented:

“The appeal of religious fundamentalism is threefold: First, these cultists claim to explain what empirical, institutional analysis cannot. They make sense out of a world that is otherwise confusing. Second, they do so in an appealingly simple way, dividing the world sharply between the forces of light, and the forces of darkness and trace all evil back to a single source, the devil, and his various agents. Third, religious cultists claim special knowledge unknown or unappreciated by others. For the cultist, the heathen masses are a brainwashed herd under the command of ultimate evil, while the cultist congratulate themselves on being able to penetrate these deceptions.”

Religious fundamentalism as a disease has become a question ever since the Central Intelligence Agency began lobbying to have “conspirisim” labeled as a mental disorder, a campaign begun by John Foster “Chip” Berlet and continued by Michael Barkun, a campaign that was initiated to silence government dissent. Now, the government moves to place similar controls against other groups who hold non-scientific views about the nature of reality.

Ok, so the AMA didn’t say this. I made it up. The quote, however, is practically verbatim from Michael Barkun, who works closely with the FBI, and has become a leading debunker on conspiracy theory, an op that involves lumping all the theories, especially the wackiest ones, in with the real researchers, and acting as if it’s all the same stuff. In other words, no conspiracy theory is valid because they are all based in delusion? How’s that for stifling all deep political research? Yet, if you just substitute Barkun’s “conspiracy theorist” with the name of any religious, social or even educational movement, and you can easily deride virtually anyone for following delusional herd instincts.

http://www.amazon.com/Killing-Lincoln-Story-Steven-Hager/dp/1503270262/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1420390977&sr=1-1&keywords=hager+lincoln

Written by Steven Hager

August 19, 2013 at 1:09 pm

The New American Blacklist

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stockIn 1949, after ten Hollywood screenwriters collectively declined to answer questions about their political sympathies to a Congressional Committee, they were fired and blacklisted. Thus began the sordid campaign to purge the film business of socialist influence.

Back then although many writers suffered, they retained their dignity, if not their salaries and today some are even celebrated as martyrs. The blacklist back then was very simple: if you were red, you were dead, at least as far as Hollywood was concerned.

In my lifetime, I’ve seen a complete reversal in the state of journalism. When I was in high school, becoming an investigative reporter was considered a noble calling. During Watergate nobody questioned the realities of government conspiracies. They were on the front page every day. Many newspapers spent a lot of money investigating stories of government misconduct.

imagesToday, the media is almost exclusively focused on the minor trials and tribulations of film and sports celebrities. Newspapers no longer invest fortunes in investigative reporting, and, in fact, if they discover prospective young employees hold unconventional political views, those prospective employees likely won’t be getting hired. There’s a dividing line and once you cross it, you won’t be invited to the party, unless, of course, you’re part of the controlled opposition, like David Icke or Alex Jones, and even then, you’re just there to provoke ridicule and brand conspiracy theory as crazy.

Right after Watergate it was revealed the CIA was producing hundreds of books every year. Today, they’re probably producing hundreds of websites, including most of the so-called conspiracy sites. The purpose of these sites is to take real conspiracies (9/11) and mix them up with crazy conspiracies (we never landed on the moon). This campaign has been going on for decades and it’s obviously a success because conspiracy theory is now practically synonymous with insanity.

We have some websites, like the Huffington Post, Alternet, and Counterpunch, all of which purport to be providing an alternative to the official government line, but on none of these sites will you ever find a serious investigation into the anomalies of the official narrative of 9/11. Such talk is banned from polite society, in fact, and any writer who espouses such views will not be allowed to attend the party. It’s another blacklist, but this time in a much more insidious form.

My feeling is most people entering the news business today understand these realities and take a “don’t look, don’t see” approach to protect their futures. They suspect there’s some dirty business going on under the covers, but as long as they keep their attention focused elsewhere and don’t discuss such doubts with their editors, their future will remain bright. But just start talking about Saudi, Pakistani and Mossad connections to 9/11 in the news room and pretty soon you might be looking for a new line of work. See, it’s pretty obvious when none of the so-called oppositional sites will accept certain views that those views are actually taboo and anyone holding them isn’t going to be securing a bright economic future any time soon.

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Film-Guide-Steven-Hager-ebook/dp/B00IOVOGHA/ref=sr_1_6?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1415012911&sr=1-6&keywords=steven+hager

Written by Steven Hager

June 5, 2013 at 8:34 pm

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