Stories from Mount Khajeh

300px-باران_در_قلعه_رستمWhen constructing the ancient temples, location was everything. You had two basic options: a dominating hill overlooking a town or city, or something in the middle of nowhere with splendid views and great feng shui.

Mt. Khajeh is a black basalt plateau rising up on an island in Lake Hamun like a flat-top mushroom. According to the Zoroastrian religion (which pre-dates Judaism, Islam and Christianity), this lake is the birthplace of the true prophet.

Three hundred years before Christ, this was one of the largest temples in existence, although a string of them stretched from Iraq to India, all dispensing the same sacrament. After arriving by ferry at the dock, one might have been greeted by beggars, musicians and a vibrant trading circle, where spices, foods, fabrics, sigils and icons could be obtained. Some might be exchanging their city outfits for the signature psychedelic tunic tied with a simple rainbow-colored hemp rope.

Om circles would be breaking out in groups along the trail as you approached the temple. The walls and temple towers would have been painted with blazing psychedelic frescos similar to today’s graffit art. “I love you” and “we love you” would be heard wafting up and down the footpath, as well as “welcome home, brother.” People who didn’t know each other would be sharing hugs and gifts. The well-healed visitors would be hiding their gold rings and earrings as these would be a badge of oppression. Expensive sandals would seem gaudy and out-of-place, lost in this barefoot army.

Drums and chanting from inside the temple could be heard from a long way off, but nothing prepared one for the explosion of energy once you passed through the arch and confronted the courtyard filled with musicians, chanters, spinners, dancers and performers. If you were lucky, a gigantic OM circle might break out as you arrived. These were scheduled for regular intervals and signaled by playing a ram’s horn.

Screen Shot 2015-02-10 at 11.58.53 AMEveryone at the temple is stoned and drinking soma, which is hot milk with cannabis and cinnamon. It’s available for free inside the temple, although most people leave a temple donation. Many sick people have come for treatment, and the critically ill have their own rooms next to the temple. There’s a free kitchen that runs on donations that feeds those who work for free in the cannabis fields and end up sleeping in the courtyard. They are temple monks and many work harder than slaves keeping this temple running, and refuse all pay as they consider temple work its own reward.

Over the centuries the rich will get control of this temple, and the psychedelic tunics replaced by black robes and real slaves will return. When this happens, only the rich will be allowed access to soma. And eventually, people will forget about the magic plant. Until someone named Moses comes along and speaks with a burning bush. And then the cycle will repeat itself again across the centuries from Moses to John the Baptist. But no matter how much the rich try to crush it, the truth just keeps coming back.

The real gift of the Magi

3kingsThere’s a tremendous amount of disinfo in play regarding the Biblical story of the three Magi and how it relates to Horus, the Egyptian sky god, who incorporated the sun, moon and stars into one supreme supernatural entity long before the arrival of the Christian mythology.

The Jesus story was built on top of a much earlier Horus myth, and both have their origins in Sumeria and primitive astrology. I say primitive because when these myths were forged, everyone believed the earth was flat and at the center of the universe. Now we know better. But our mythologies remain clouded by past beliefs.

On the winter solstice, the sun reaches its most southern point in the sky and strangely hovers for three three days in the exact same location before making the annual trek north, a voyage that will end on the summer solstice (which is also the day Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, becomes visible above the horizon).

The story of the Magi as handed down in the Bible has been tinkered with, but I can interpret the real story using common sense as my guide. According to the Bible, the Magi brought gold, frankincense and myrrh to celebrate the birth of the Son. This seems unlikely, and I’d suggest the Three Kings from the East brought the three greatest medicines of their time, which may have been cannabis, frankincense and myrrh, the most fragrant terpene-rich plant oils, although opium seems like a possible replacement for myrrh. Someday the real medicinal value of these plants will re-emerge.

According to Plutarch, the Temple of Isis burned three different incense, one at dawn, one at noon, and one at sunset. He identified these as: frankincense, myrrh and kyphi. Doesn’t it seem reasonable to assume these are the gifts brought by the Three Kings to celebrate the Birth of the Son? So not only do they switch kyphi with gold, but then they bury the identity of kyphi. I say kyphi is cannabis, and maybe even an early version of wax and/or shatter.

Rather than keep our major religions clouded by dogma and superstition, I prefer to help them evolve and grow into the new millennium. Cannabis played a major role in the development of Christianity and most other religions, but was strangely removed as a sacrament and replaced with alcohol along the way. This terrible injustice needs to be rectified. We can honor the rituals, ceremonies and myths of fundamentalist religion, while rejecting their dogmas and superstitions, and fixing their problems internally.

Someday, I’ll publish a book detailing my interpretations of all the major religious myths, so instead of being brainwashed by bullshit, people can get some wisdom and perspective on these important issues.

Five new paperbacks

4booksholidaysI’d been hoping my fans would switch to reading books on tablets so we could save some trees, which is why I’ve been releasing nothing but ebooks for the past two years, and sales have been slow but steady, although some fans keep clamoring for print books, so I unleashed five today.

OM science 101

Shiva "all gods are one"Thousands of years ago, great fire temples dotted the hillsides from India to Iraq, all serving a sacred plant mixed with milk and spices as a sacrament and healing medicine. Isn’t it wonderful they handed down a ritual to us used to aid in the healing process?

Someday modern medicine will wise up to the spiritual aspects of healing, and, in fact, that day seems closer all the time. The reason I know our medical establishment needs a huge overhaul is because of the tremendous resistance to using natural cannabis as medicine, while putting the entire country on synthetic drugs, mostly so corporations could make more profits.

Many years ago, a learned scholar from the East informed me there were actually three sounds in an OM. When he told me that, some of my training in theater popped in my head. I’d taken a course to enhance my speaking abilities, and learned something about the mechanics of speech. The OM may be the only healing ritual that works every time, while carrying zero dogma. It’s only role is telepathic harmonization on a vibration of peace. Allen Ginsberg once used it to protect himself and others during a police riot, and Wavy Gravy used it to drive Charlie Manson from his realm.

The OM starts deep in the belly, in your center of energy, and travels through your chest until it resonates your skull structures. The “mmmm” is held out because it’s ringing your bell. You mostly feel this Y-buzz around your nose. If you’re not vibrating your face at the end, the OM doesn’t work properly, so find that frequency, and once you do, you will feel it instantly.

The beauty of the OM is no one is ever off-tune. There are no bad notes. You may understand the connection between music, math and spirituality, but have you ever known a hymn with no bad notes? Before cannabis spirituality fell under intense persecution, there were probably hundreds of thousands of people in and around those giant fire temples doing OM circles and sharing healing energy. And isn’t it amazing they found a way to pass this ceremony down to us 10,000 years later, even if all the books and texts were tampered with to eradicate the identity of the healing plants they once used to cure almost everything.

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How to plan a 420 ceremony

flashing 420Funny how many seem antagonistic to ceremonies. Just mention the word and a shiver goes up their back. They don’t realize ceremonies are a part of their life. Magic and spirituality move through us all naturally, and it doesn’t matter what names you put on anything, everything that ever happened keeps happening over and over.

Ceremonies have purposes, as well as flavors, and you can surf any vibration you want. Most family/tribal ceremonies unify the family/tribe and raise spirits. In order to unify, everyone needs to meditate on a single vibration for some brief instant. In a healthy family, the vibration being channeled is most often love.

Ever notice how the words “I love you” are magic? And how difficult to say sometimes. Sharing love energy is a ceremony. But then sharing anything is a ceremony.

Did you know there’s a love ceremony handed down for over 10,000 years intact, one that carries zero dogma and seeks only to harmonize participants? To outsiders, it may seem strange and can be mistaken for some cult brainwashing tool, but I guarantee this ancient ceremony works as well as any I’ve ever run across. It’s called the OM circle.

When your fight/flight response is activated, your emergency energy system turns on, and that jolt of energy has a tendency to overwhelm your brain, resulting in unproductive panic behavior. In that state you can easily freeze, or make the worst decision possible. Mental states are telepathic and create energy waves that can be felt and amplified, which is why panic spreads through a crowd fast as wind-whipped fire.

Fear is the basis of all mind control, and when a sorcerer wants to cast a spell, creating a panic and guiding that vibration wherever he wants is the primary device at his disposal. A scapegoat will be manufactured, tortured in public and then executed, followed by free grog for all. This is the way dark magic has worked for millennium.

Modern media has put most of the population on the edge of fight/flight mode through extreme levels of violence programming. And you won’t find much solace from this vibration in the conspiracy community, where fear levels are tweaked even higher.

Ten thousand years ago, the use of a certain sacramental plant spread like a wild-fire across most of the globe, from Europe to India to China. Enormous temples were built in the honor of this plant. But they weren’t just temples, they were the greatest hospitals and healing centers of their time. The plant was mixed with hot milk and spices and served to treat all afflictions, and became known as the king of healing plants, creator of magic and immortality, the tree of life.

It was the birth of a great age of enlightenment and coincided with the creation of most of our great religions. At the time this plant arrived, all things had long been considered to have spirit energies, and temples were built to countless gods and goddesses, but the message this plant conveyed concerned a Great Spirit that connected All Things.

But some dark sorcerer made the plant that caused the awakening a scapegoat. It was a clever campaign, executed in stages over a great expanse of time. The plant’s ceremonial powers virtually disappeared for 2,000 years, while the spiritual cultures it birthed were corrupted: false priests installed, new dogmas created. All trace of the plant was removed from all texts, a ploy not entirely successful, so deep was this plant woven into the fabric of these cultures.

In the 1880s, the plant’s magic ceremonial powers were rediscovered in New Orleans by African slaves owned by French planters who’d recently escaped the Haitian Revolution. These slaves invited Natives and others to join their ceremonies and soon created the most influential cultural movement of any time. However, no sooner did this movement appear, than governments moved to squash it, using persecution of the plant as the hammer to achieve their goal.

In the 1960s, surfers in California discovered the plant, and it led them on a sacred journey back to the plant’s original origins. When they returned from Afghanistan, they brought the ancient OM circle used at those original healing temples that once dotted the landscape from India to Iran. It is also the best method for dispelling panic and turning off fight/flight mode. And thus I believe it can also be an important tool to help deprogram the mind control memes being run today. It can also be an great tool to heal PTSD, which can create a near-constant fight/flight mode.

So when people ask me to prescribe 420 ceremonies, I must confess the OM is the greatest harmonization ritual I know, and I think it works through a triangulation of touch, sound and telepathy.

But wouldn’t it be a wonderful thing to see a hundred thousand voices erupt in an OM in Denver some day?

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Which is the real killer of Gemma and David?

cabbanis31n-1-webPerhaps you heard the story of how Gemma Moss, 31, supposedly died from “cannabis toxicity?” At least, that was the findings of the local coroner in England. This is the second time a coroner in England has claimed death from “cannabis toxicity,” something not recognized by the medical community. Gemma was a devout Christian who left three young children behind. She passed unexpectedly in her sleep. She was estranged from her husband, who reportedly lives in Jamaica with their daughter, while Gemma was raising their two sons. She was a regular user of cannabis, who typically smoked half a joint a night to help her sleep. If she had a heart attack, as the coroner claims, then she died from a heart condition, not from “cannabis toxicity,” which can result in panic attacks, the munchies or sleep, but cannot kill.

david-hallman-1Today, we learned of another sad death. David Hallman, 21, a senior at Denison University in Ohio, who was majoring in history. He’d spent three years on the swimming and diving teams, and remained close with his teammates, although he was no longer competing.

David left Brews Cafe at 2 am and started walking home early Saturday morning. But after walking a half mile, he either passed out, or decided to take a rest. David was found frozen that night after a frantic search that lasted for hours. He was slumped against a garage door across the street from a golf course.

Now David didn’t die from alcohol, he froze to death, but, in fact, without the alcohol in his system, he would not have passed out. Death from hypothermia after binge drinking is fairly common and every year an average of 1,300 people in America die from hypothermia. If you are binge drinking during winter months, and the temperature is below zero, please take a cab home. Cold can kill you, cannabis cannot.

The New Pot Enlightenment

NPEcoverI guess you realize zeitgeists are shifting around the world thanks to our rapidly evolving 21st century technologies?

The creation of the Internet will eventually be viewed as even more transforming than the invention of the printing press was back in 1450. Maybe you realize the printing press ushered in the Renaissance?

Very soon, I expect the Internet to manifest a similar leap in consciousness for the generation coming of age now, the echo boomers. Boomers like me were the first to grow up watching television, and that certainly had a powerful effect on us, but television was always primarily a vehicle for advertising and state-sponsored propaganda, while the Internet can be a powerful tool for self-education, enlightenment and cultural revolution.

Today, cannabis coverage in the mass media is restricted mostly to recreational or medical use, and the recreational side of marijuana is usually portrayed with a negative twist, employing the stoner-stupid slacker-slob stereotypes.

I know it’s a big leap of faith, but I’m grabbing the flag and heading for the high ground and hoping others will join my quest to create a more responsible image for cannabis users, one that respects the ceremonial and spiritual aspects of the plant, a tradition that stretches all the way back into pre-history.

So please check out my free ebook on this subject. You can find it here. :https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/387392

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