stevenhager420

counterculture history, conspiracy theory & reviews

The Conspirator: an overlooked film on Lincoln’s assassination

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I just watched a film about the Lincoln assassination on Amazon Prime for free. It’s a Robert Redford production that was released a couple of years ago, but it didn’t even hit my radar back then. But the film certainly strikes some timely chords today.

The Conspirator shows how Secretary of War Edwin Stanton completely controlled the investigation into Lincoln’s assassination, which concentrated only on finding minor characters on the fringe of the conspiracy, but did nothing to locate the actual figures that may have been in command of the situation and may have even let the primary assassin skip free. I’ve written earlier about the possible involvement of Albert Pike, a Confederate General, in Lincoln’s assassination. (See: “The Truth About Albert Pike.) At some point, the possibility of a much larger conspiracy deep within the Masonic community will have to be addressed. Pike, after all, was the most powerful Mason of his time. Lincoln was not a member of the Masons. But Edwin Stanton certainly was.

Today many people seem to think John Wilkes Booth acted alone because that’s the only way political assassinations in this country are spun—probably to protect the guilty—but, in fact, Booth was just one of three assassins in play that day. The plot also included attacks on Vice President Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward. Some people think the other two were marked for death in order to engineer the line of succession, but at the time of the assassination, the Secretary of State was not even in that line, which, by the way, has been re-tooled several times over the years.

In the movie, the conspirators are tried by military tribunal and enjoy none of the rights of a civilian trial. The film adeptly shows how Stanton cared little for civil rights. His only concern was to get some people hanged and hanged quickly. After this sham trial, a law would be passed insuring the rights of every American citizen to due process and a fair trial—even in times of war. Unfortunately, those rights seem to have been rescinded by the Patriot Act.

Someday perhaps our rights to a fair trial will be returned. I’m sure future generations will look upon the Patriot Act and everything that followed, including the current sham trial taking place in Guantanamo Bay, with horror. After railroading Mary Surratt onto the gallows, the government was unable to convict her son John in a civilian trial 16 months later after he was captured following an extensive manhunt. John had participated in a failed attempt to kidnap Lincoln with Booth and then fled the country after discovering the plan had switched to an assassination plot. If a civilian court could not find John Surratt guilty, it’s doubtful his mother would have ever been convicted in a legitimate trial.

JohnWilkesBooth_LGYou have to wonder if Booth escaped, though, and the others were just patsies, since some members of Booth’s famous family have always asserted Booth did not die in a fire in a barn outside Port Royal as the government asserts, but, instead, another’s charred body was substituted and Booth walked free. According to some of his ancestors, Booth committed suicide in 1903 in Texas and they were even willing to have the alleged body presumed to be Booth to be exhumed so that the DNA remains could be tested against a known Booth family member. Who knows who to believe? Booth’s dentist ID’d the teeth in those charred remains as being Booth’s and the corpse did have a broken ankle, which Booth certainly suffered after jumping to the stage following the assassination. But the mysteries linger.

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