stevenhager420

counterculture history, conspiracy theory & reviews

Back to video

leave a comment »

There are so many crackpot videos on conspiracy theory floating around that I’ve decided to return to video-editing for a while and create some of my own, only instead of directing people into a deep rabbit hole of paranoia (like most do), I’m more interested in empowering people to take control of their own magic. I whipped out a small sample, so I hope you check it out.

And yes, I realize there’s a typo, left because this is a sketch and not a finished piece. I suspect I will launch into a major documentary on the Lincoln assassination soon, with this as my launching pad. Here’s another segment:

Written by Steven Hager

October 29, 2014 at 8:59 am

Boardwalk Empire fizzles out

leave a comment »

boardwalk-empire-eldorado_article_story_largeI had high hopes for Boardwalk Empire when the show first arrived, but got alarmed after I realized there was zero attempt to maintain historical accuracy. After the shark jumped ten times, I began losing my passion for the show, so I was not shocked by the fizzle-out ending.

If they had only told the real story of Nucky Johnson and his epic feud with William Randolph Hearst, but I guess that was too close to the real oligarchy. Nucky was not rubbed-out on the boardwalk, but jailed for tax evasion, the same fate that brought down his buddy Al Capone. After four years in jail, he returned to a much downsized Atlantic City, which had been crushed by the 1929 stock market crash. Although production qualities and acting remained peerless on this show, the script was mostly concerned with creative staging of moments of extreme violence. But meaningless violence is on the rise everywhere these days.

holsteinI was especially annoyed how they transformed Harlem numbers king Casper Holstein (left) into a completely heartless dope peddler. In fact, Holstein was the genius who figured out how to engineer a gambling racket based off the daily stock market tally and was a great supporter of charities and known as the black Andrew Carnegie.

Boardwalk Empire pretended to tell the story of the birth of organized crime, but they distorted the story beyond recognition. Lucky Luciano is mostly known as the first gangster who made a deal with an intelligence agency. He did not invent the concept of a Sicilian “Commission of Peace.” According to Joseph Bonanno, who was there at the beginning with Luciano, the idea of this commission predated Bonanno’s arrival in the United States (1908). National conventions had been held infrequently over the decades and the network was not uncovered by law enforcement until the 1950s, but the concept had been floated after a war broke out between two Italian families in New Orleans over rights to unload banana boats owned by Italian shipping lines, resulting in a lot of bad publicity and crackdowns against Italian-Americans nationally. The society was organized similar to the many Masonic secret societies, only with one grade instead of the usual three. The important part of these secret societies is promising to keep the secrets or give the society permission to snuff out your life. These vows proved effective as the first turncoats from inside would not emerge until the 1960s.

The Ultimate Film Guide

The Ultimate Film Guide

Buy from Amazon

 

 

 

Written by Steven Hager

October 27, 2014 at 8:16 am

The million dollar assassination

leave a comment »

IMG_0430On December 1, 1864, four-and-a-half months before J. Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln in Ford’s Theater, a plea for crowd-funding the assassination appeared in Alabama’s Salem Dispatch:

One Million Dollars, Wanted, to Have Peace by the 1st of March

If the citizens of the Southern Confederacy will furnish me with the cash, or good securities for the sum of one million dollars, I will cause the lives of Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward and Andrew Johnson to be taken by the first of March next. This will give us peace and satisfy the world that cruel tyrants cannot live in the “land of liberty.” If this is not accomplished nothing will be claimed beyond the sum of fifty thousand dollars, in advance, which is supposed to be necessary to reach and slaughter the three villains I will give, myself, one thousand dollars towards this patriotic purpose. Every one wish to contribute will address Box X, Cahaba, Alabama.

After the assassination, Henry Grimes of Ohio cut it out and attached the ad to a letter to Secretary of State Seward (above). Seward had barely survived being murdered and was saved thanks to a metal collar around his neck, a device a doctor had installed because Seward suffered a fall from his moving carriage the day before. Isn’t it somewhat strange zero investigation was conducted as to how much money was sent to this post office box in sleepy Cahaha, Alabama, and who picked it up? Also suspicious is why are Seward and Johnson signaled out for death with Lincoln, when the South hated Thaddeus Stevens and Charles Sumner far more, not to mention Edwin Stanton, a former Democrat, was universally detested. So the choice of Lincoln, Seward and Johnson seems odd and not really emanating from a true Southern patriot, but an agenda of a different stripe.

jfkadtreasonI imagine the ad was placed by Sandford Conover (real name Charles Dunham), who is a bit of a Zelig in the story of Lincoln’s assassination, always in the shadows at key moments, although few history books mention his name or any of his many aliases. Conover had a knack for creative fundraising and I suspect he also forged the letter from Booth to Edwin Stanton postmarked New York City the day of the assassination. His use of disinformation, misdirection and manipulation of news is absolutely spellbinding and nearly impossible to fully unravel, but it appears Conover wrote the book on military counterintelligence propaganda, while managing to stay completely hidden from history until now. My spotlight shines brightly on him in my expose Killing Lincoln: The Real Story.

The beginning of December is when this operation was set in motion to bend a previous plot to kidnap Lincoln into Lincoln’s assassination, employing the same cast and crew. Isn’t it strange that a similar ad attacking President Kennedy appeared the day of his arrival in Dallas? And in case you missed the morning paper, there was a similar flyer handed out on the streets accusing JFK of treason.

Consider the crew that killed JFK was the same team that had been hired months earlier to kill Castro, but when JFK shut down the get-Castro mission, the same get-team was diverted to get him. It goes to show how similar deep political events are: similar problems, similar solutions and similar scripts appear again and again.

welcome+to+dallas+mr.+kennedy

 

 

Killing Lincoln: The Real Story

Killing Lincoln: The Real Story

Buy from Amazon

Written by Steven Hager

October 15, 2014 at 10:44 am

Killing Lincoln: the real story

leave a comment »

9780805093070I conducted my own investigation into the assassination of Abraham Lincoln after viewing Robert Redford’s, The Conspirator (free on Netflix), a film that documents how a kangaroo military court sent an innocent Mary Surratt to the gallows to cover up the real assassination plot. It’s obvious she was railroaded if you just read the transcripts of the trial, but why?

When I told some people what I was doing, many asked if I’d read Bill O’Reilly’s recent book on the subject. I had no idea he’d written the book, much less that it had become a huge bestseller and launched a franchise of similar historical assassination books.

But after a month of research using mostly original documents from the era, I had to check out Killing Lincoln. It took me about 20 minutes to speed read the book because this is territory I know quite well at this point, so I was skimming major points of evidence, looking for rabbit holes and wanting to see which crucial characters were addressed and which left out entirely.

Unfortunately, O’Reilly pretty much faithfully follows the official cover story Booth was a lunatic operating with a small band of conspirators. His book didn’t cover the trials, so he doesn’t reveal the government’s case was based on proven perjuries.

You can’t analyze the assassination with any degree of success unless you study the role of Sanford Conover (real name Charles Dunham), the double agent and newspaper reporter who groomed the witnesses for the original trial. Another important figure left out of most books is Simon Wolf, of B’nai B’rith, who was close to John Wilkes Booth and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. We know Wolf held a private meeting with Booth the day of the assassination at the National Hotel because many years later, Wolf wrote about this meeting in his memoirs, and seems to have told some lies while doing so, so what was Wolf covering up?

LincolncoverO’Reilly invents a lot of details and pretends to know people’s inner thoughts, but never figured out the alleged assassination attempts on Vice President Johnson, General Grant and Edwin Stanton were all invented for the trial, and there’s not a shred of evidence anyone was supposed to be killed that night except Lincoln and William Seward, which makes total sense since they were the only ones pushing for Southern forgiveness. Lincoln wanted to pardon the South and allow them back into Congress after the war, something that greatly upset the radical Republican cabal that had captured Congress and actually put Lincoln into power. But Lincoln was drifting off the course set by his party leaders, and that’s why he was murdered.

I just published my own book in time for the 150th anniversary: Killing Lincoln: The Real Story, because O’Reilly never gets close to the truth.

The key suspects in this case are Edwin Stanton, Thaddeus Stevens and Ben Wade, and I’ve uncovered forensic evidence from the period that links all three to the plot. Funny how Stevens and Wade never get a mention in O’Reilly’s book, even though they held a meeting with other leaders of the radicals in Congress the day after the assassination during which Stevens referred to Lincoln’s death as a “godsend.”

Killing Lincoln: The Real Story

Killing Lincoln: The Real Story

Buy from Amazon

Written by Steven Hager

October 11, 2014 at 6:47 am

The morning after

leave a comment »

Lincoln debates Wade-Davis with Radical before his pocket veto.

Lincoln debates Wade-Davis with Radicals before his pocket veto.

Look in the shadows around the edges of President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, and you might find some useful information. I find the meeting at Ben Wade’s the morning after pretty fascinating.

Although Lincoln had been elevated to the Presidency by a shaky alliance of two dozen Republican Congressmen and Cabinet members, and he went along with their War to End Slavery, he refused to follow their tack when it came to treating the South as a banana republic with zero representation and tons of new taxation afterwards, which is why he vetoed the Wade-Davis Bill and was planning a secret peace agreement.

Lincoln had just started his second term when the war drew to a close, which meant he was going to be in control for a long time. And that is why Lincoln had to go.

Thaddeus Stevens is often correctly painted as the Robespierre of the Civil War, but Wade is also a good fit for that role. They both seem completely without scruples when it comes to achieving an agenda. The strange thing about the top abolitionists is a lack of love for fellow man, as they seem driven mostly by hate. Before joining this cabal Stevens had been an anti-mason, yet many in this new circle were certainly masons. Power, wealth and glory seems a more likely motivation driving some of these men, and having ardent anti-slave opinions was the fastest way to rise within this cabal.

Wade-Davis Bill

Wade-Davis Bill

George Julian (head of the Agriculture Committee), Zachariah Chandler, and John Covode assembled at Wade’s house when they learned Lincoln was mortally wounded and expected to soon die. Stevens was also in attendance, and would write later of this meeting:

“Their hostility towards Lincoln’s policy of conciliation and contempt for his weakness were undisguised; and the universal feeling among radical men here is that his death is a godsend. It really seems so, for among the last acts of his official life was an invitation to some of the chief rebel conspirators to meet in Richmond and confer with us on the subject of peace.”

And there you have it, the real reason Lincoln had to go, and go quickly….was he was planning a meeting with Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Cabinet to work out a peace proposal. All these men would soon praise Lincoln and help elevate him to sainthood, and never say another bad word about him, but in reality they didn’t just celebrate his death, a few undoubtedly helped plot it.

 

The Ultimate Film Guide

The Ultimate Film Guide

Buy from Amazon

Written by Steven Hager

October 10, 2014 at 10:06 am

Why Fort Sumter and Gulf of Tonkin are the same thing

with one comment

Ft_Sumter_in_battle...530-wideFew expected Abraham Lincoln would become the 16th president. The newly-formed Republican Party had better-known options: Salmon Chase, William Seward, Simon Cameron, Edward Bates, William Dayton, Ben Wade or Thaddeus Stevens, but Lincoln was the new-comer compromise selection of a radical Republican cabal that took supreme power in North America after Democrats seceded, abandoning their positions of power in Congress and the Cabinet.

Lincoln arrived into a hornet’s nest not unlike the situation facing John F. Kennedy when the Bay of Pigs dropped in his lap upon arrival in the White House. The Bay of Pigs was supposed to be a catalyst for full-on invasion of Cuba, but once Kennedy saw the operation had little popular support in Cuba, he pulled stakes, infuriating our Military Industrial Complex and the CIA spooks who’d worked on that operation.

The story you’ve heard of Fort Sumter is not entirely correct, nor is the history of the Civil War nor Lincoln’s assassination, at least not as related by Ken Burns.

Slavery was not the real issue that sparked secession, it was the right of states to withdraw from the union. Do you think any state would have signed that original agreement to form a union if they thought it was permanent and irrevocable? The South firmly believed every state had a legal right to secede for any reason it wanted. The South didn’t seek an armed rebellion and were eager to negotiate any peaceful, legal solution.

The accurate part of Spielberg’s Lincoln is it shows how all attempts by the South to make peace were rebuffed by Lincoln. And the entire incident with Fort Sumter that sparked the armed conflict was carefully instigated as a provocation, the same way all our wars begin: some wag-the-dog operation for the press to go hysterical over.

The truth is the Radical Republicans didn’t want a peaceful solution, they wanted bloody war, and they’d been baiting the Democrats in Congress for months to secede so they could start one, and the first thing they did when Lincoln arrived in the White House was convince him to stage a provocation for armed conflict, telling him this was required to keep border states like Maryland from joining the rebellion. Baltimore was north of Washington, so secession of Maryland would leave Congress virtually surrounded. Lincoln was a novice, so all he could do was take the advice of more experienced men around him, much the same way JFK was stuck under the thumb of the Pentagon when he’d first arrived. But as time went on, both men found their personal centers of gravity, and began to drift off the designated tack their party bigwigs were trying to steer.

When the smoke cleared after the bloody Civil War, the big winners were the banks, J.P. Morgan, and Jay Gould. Follow the money.

Everything You Need to Know about the JFK Assassination

Everything You Need to Know about the JFK Assassination

Buy from Amazon

Written by Steven Hager

October 9, 2014 at 2:53 pm

Why wasn’t Booth arrested in March?

leave a comment »

Mary_Surratt_house_-_Brady-HandyOn November 1, 1864, Louis Weichmann moved into widow Mary Surratt’s boarding house, 604 H Street NW, Washington DC. Surratt’s son John was an important courier for the Confederacy who kept his mother and sister in the dark about his activities in order to shield them from culpability. Weichmann was an old friend of the family, an elementary school chum of John’s and a fellow Catholic.

Weichmann worked as a clerk at the War Department of Prisons and sat next to Daniel H.L. Gleason. After arriving at the boarding house, he immediately began telling Gleason the house was a nest of illegal activities. Of course, the possibility exists Weichmann was placed in the house as a confidential informant from the beginning, the results are the same either way. That fall Weichmann began informing on Surratt and his friend John Wilkes Booth.

On April 18, 1865, four days after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, Gleason testified Weichmann informed him in March that “he was well-acquainted with some blockade runners, young fellows, not secessionists, who were out for money and excitement, who were currently involved in a new project that aroused his suspicion.” This message wormed its way up the chain-of-command and it soon came back down Weichmann should join this project, whatever it was. But in 1911, Gleason unloaded his conscience and confessed the real story: the War Department was made aware of John Wilkes Booth’s plot to kidnap Lincoln weeks before the assassination.

Since Stanton controlled the secret police, the army, the telegraph and the entire Washington DC police force, his power was absolute and once he discovered this plot, Booth was obviously at his mercy. At any time, Stanton could have arrested Booth and hanged him for treason, standard treatment for a Confederate spook like Booth, although Booth represented a high-profile celebrity trophy catch, and as such might expect special treatment.

So why wasn’t Booth arrested in March?

Even stranger, Stanton suddenly demoted his chief detective, moving the head of the National Detective Police to Manhattan, leaving the NDP headless for the crucial few weeks the assassination plot unfolded.

I believe Stanton sent a message to Booth through an intermediary, someone like Simon Wolf, a close friend of Booth’s who could be relied on for confidentiality, and that message could have gone something like:

boothI know who you are and can have you arrested and hanged tomorrow. I can also hang your secret fiance Bessie Hale and your brother Edwin. On the other hand, you could take $10,000 and agree to assassinate Lincoln and Seward and tie this plot to Johnson. If you take the second option, I’ll insure you have time to escape. I’ll deny ever offering this deal.

Just a hint of the sort of buttons Stanton could have pushed and if he did push them, maybe you can see Booth in a different light? Booth’s entire famous family could have been implicated, not just his brother. And, of course, Booth would have done anything to protect Bessie from harm, being he was a true Southern gentleman. Stanton’s specialty was manufacturing evidence, and he had a entire crew led by Sanford Conover (real name Charles Dunham) for this purpose, so guilt or innocence never got in the way of his agenda.

This is the only scenario that makes any sense if you consider Booth claimed in his diary he could return to Washington and clear his name. Also, John Parker, the guard who deserted his post was never punished, went back to work inside the White House the next day. Knowing Stanton ripped-up most every Presidential pardon, this sudden overwhelming sense of forgiveness for both Parker and Boston Corbett was inexplicable, unless this is exactly what Stanton wanted to happen: and unguarded President and dead assassin to tell no tales.

Secret Societies

Secret Societies

Buy from Amazon

Written by Steven Hager

October 9, 2014 at 12:41 pm

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,563 other followers

%d bloggers like this: